Welcome to the  

Woods Fall Wonders

After-School Program Information & Registration Site

New Class Offering:

Kids Mindful Movement Spotlight Series

 This class strives to make mindfulness more accessible to children

through engaging and fun programming.

The instructors know kids have a desire to move, create and explore,

so they meet them where they are.  Click here for more class info and to register.

Woods Charter School's First-Ever Chess Teams Forming this Year!

Who: Students in Grade 2 and Up

When: Thursdays Oct 18 - Dec 20

Time: 3:15pm to 4:30pm

Fee: $110

Sign your student up for one of two REAL chess teams! 

(Beginner and Intermediate)

Students will learn chess fundamentals and strategies that enhance learning skills and critical thinking.

We will build confidence and have the option to compete against other local schools.

This opportunity is open to both novice and experienced players, who will form beginning and advanced teams.


What's New

Aug 30, 2018
RUNNING CLUB REGISTRATION OPEN!

Running with the Wolves has just published its Fall Schedule, and Registration is now open for students in grades 1 - 4.  

    

That guy's not running -- He's FLYING!!!

Here are five good reasons every kid

should drop the video game controller

and head out that door for a run!

1. The Run and Post-Run Rush

You know that feeling you get when you ace a test or beat your buddy in Mario Cart? You can get that same feeling through running. It’s called “the runner’s high,” and it makes you feel like you are strong, fast and on top of the world. Best of all, the feeling of euphoria lingers long after you stop moving.

Even running for 10 minutes around the block is enough to get something called “endorphins” (a chemical in the brain that makes us feel happy) flowing. Combine that with the joy of being outside, away from school or homework, and you’ve got a recipe for success.

2. To Keep in Shape

Running is the easiest, quickest way to stay in shape, both for other sports and for life in general.

Being able to hustle and play good defense is very important in almost every sport, but you have to be in shape to do both on a consistent basis. Running a few times a week is the perfect way to get your legs and lungs ready for a full-court press or an outfield dash to catch a fly ball. Just 10 to 30 minutes a day is all you need to make a big difference in your game.

Even if you don’t play other sports – actually, especially if you don’t play other sports – running is still an important part of a healthy lifestyle. People of all ages should exercise a few times a week.

3. To Get Smart

Studies have shown that just a little bit of aerobic exercise each day can actually create new brain cells and improve memory (you can tell a sport is “aerobic” because it causes you to be out of breath, but you can still do it longer than five minutes). One test showed that students who ran for 30 minutes were better able to memorize and remember information than when they stayed still or lifted weights.

So if you are having a hard time concentrating in class or struggling with tests, try going for a run before you study. Get healthy and get smarter … quite the one-two punch.

4. To Discover New Places

Running takes you places. You can explore the woods, the neighborhood or the beach. You can explore almost anywhere and do so powered by your own two feet. It is a good opportunity to experience things you might have otherwise missed, like a bird’s nest, a new trail, or a view from high above your town. Running gives you a little taste of freedom.

5. To Excel in the Sport

Running is a sport, too! Most middle and high schools have seasonal cross country and track programs with daily practice and weekend competitions. Both sports provide great opportunities for those who play other sports to get in shape and stay competitive in the offseason. They also offer a unique chance for those who have never played a sport to get involved in athletics.

The benefits of joining a [running] team?

  • You can’t be benched and don’t have to worry about playing time.
  • There are no plays to memorize and practice is never boring.
  • Kids from all different groups usually join the team, so there is a place and a friend for everyone.
  • You get out of it what you put into it. If you want to be good, you can train harder. If you are in it for social reasons or just to stay in shape, you won’t be affecting anyone else’s success
  • The team still matters. Even though each person competes individually, it is still a team sport, and the camaraderie that makes ball sports so fun still exists.
  • Most programs are co-ed, which can make for a fun (and funny) atmosphere that you just can’t get anywhere else.
  • Daily practice is an enjoyable way to stay motivated and stay active.

Get Moving!

Running can be a sport, an adventure, an avenue to better your grades, or a way to become happier and enjoy a longer life. The more you run, the more fun and rewarding it becomes.

Excerpted from an Article in SportRunning.com

So, parents, what are you waiting for?  

Register your kids NOW for Running with the Wolves!

Aug 29, 2018
The Brainy Benefits of Chess

Chess Makes the Grade

Fall Session Starts on Thursday, October 18th

Click on the picture for class description.

Schools that encourage chess are reacting to studies like that of New York City-based educational psychologist Stuart Margulies, Ph.D., who in 1996 found that elementary school students in Los Angeles and New York who played chess scored approximately 10 percentage points higher on reading tests than their peers who didn't play. James M. Liptrap, a teacher and chess sponsor at Klein High School in Spring, TX, conducted a similar study in 1997. He found that fifth-graders who played chess scored 4.3 points higher on state reading assessments and 6.4 points higher on math tests than their non-chess-playing peers.

Further proof comes from the doctoral dissertation of Robert Ferguson, executive director of the American Chess School in Bradford, PA. He studied junior-high students, each of whom was enrolled in an activity -- either working with computers, playing chess, taking a creative writing workshop, or playing Dungeons and Dragons -- that was designed to develop critical and creative thinking skills. By the time the students had spent about 60 hours on their chosen activities, the chess players were well ahead of the others in several psychological tests, scoring almost 13 percentage points higher in critical thinking and 35 percentage points higher in creative thinking.

Experts attribute chess players' higher scores to the rigorous workout chess gives the brain:  chess improves a child's visual memory, attention span, and spatial-reasoning ability. And because it requires players to make a series of decisions, each move helps kids learn to plan ahead, evaluate alternatives, and use logic to make sound choices.

Excerpted from Parents Magazine, Article by Beth Weinhouse